Tips To Help You Control Diabetes

 

 

Diabetes is one of those diseases that will not discriminate. People can be affected by this disease as a toddler and have to spend their entire life controlling their insulin levels and dietary habits, or it can strike you later in life. If you have diabetes, you need to read these great tips in the text below.

If you’re having trouble getting the motivation to exercise after being diagnosed with Type II Diabetes, get in the game! Competitive sports are not only fun, but you have other people who rely on you to show up so that there are enough players for a game. Having them breathing down your neck will convince you to be on time!

If your child is diagnosed with Diabetes, make keeping track of their blood sugar fun. Have a contest where they get a reward for doing their blood sugar on time every day for a certain number of days, like a trip to the toy store or an hour at the park.

The best thing a person can do to avoid diabetes is to exercise. People who exercise 30 to 60 minutes per day, at least 5 days per week, can lower their risk of developing diabetes by almost 50 percent. Exercise improves the health of your heart and lungs, reduces stress, reduces fat, increases metabolism and lowers blood sugar levels.

Find a diabetic friend to support you through your journey with diabetes. You’ll be able to swap ideas, share recipes and just have a shoulder to cry on when things get stressful. You can even give them a call when you’re having a craving and they’ll talk you through it! Friends can keep you sane and that’s especially true, if they’re going through the same hardship that you are.

Many people think diabetics have to avoid all sweets, but this isn’t necessarily true. When planning a sweet dessert or snack, just make sure it is included in a healthy meal or with exercise. Your doctor can guide you with pointers to help you include desserts and snacks in your diet.

Manage your blood glucose sugars with an added sense of urgency if you have been diagnosed with diabetic eye disease. Studies have shown that closely monitored glucose levels can slow the progression and worsening of eye disease over time. This is important even if you have been diagnosed with mild to moderate diabetes.

If you find that your A1C levels are disproportionately higher than your typical blood glucose levels, the problem may be that you are measuring your pre-meal levels, which does not give you an accurate reading. Your average levels may not accurately reflect readings that are taken before, during, and after eating your meals.

No matter when you contracted your diabetes, the more important point is that you begin today in trying whatever you can to fight the disease. You can get started on leading a normal life by using the tips you learned here. Never stop learning about diabetes and always remember to keep moving forward.